Sibenik

Sibenik

Sibenik

The historic town of Sibenik, connected with the expansion and development of the early Croatian state, is rich in cultural and historical monuments.

The most representative among them is the famous Cathedral of Sibenik, one of the most original architectural projects of the late Middle Ages, primarily linked to the local master Juraj Matejev Dalmatinac (George of Dalmatia). Sibenik is today a tourist centre situated in the area where the best-indented archipelago in Europe (Islands of Kornati) and karst hydrographical phenomena (Skradinski Buk, Visovac, Roski Waterfall) merge into the ecologically and aesthetically most attractive tourist and recreational zone on the Croatian Adriatic. The most popular cultural events include the International Child’s Festival (last week in June and first week in July), the Summer Organ School (in the second half of August) and the Sibenik Summer. The Day of St. James (25th of July), the patron saint of the city, is festively commemorated.

The open sea and islands are reached from the 300-1200 metre-wide and 10 km long Šibenik Bay, through the narrow, winding channel. Although the coastal belt of the Šibenik area only reaches a few kilometers inland, to the Trtar mountain chain and Mt. Svilaja in the south-eastern part, 66 % of all its population live here. After World War II it underwent very rapid urbanization. Almost all manufacturing plants, business activities and the economic strength of Šibenik County is concentrated here.

This region is characterized by limestone mountain crests, small valleys (Gornje and Donje polje) and plateaus which are the base for agriculture. Vegetation is mainly spruce in the hinterland and maquis on the coastal areas and on the islands. The Šibenik region has a characteristic. Mediterranean climate with hot summers cooled by the maestral breeze, and dry winters.
Šibenik, the oldest native Croatian city on the Adriatic, is located in the most protected natural harbour, in the centre of the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, at the mouth of the beautiful Krka River, at the sources of Croatia’s rich history, probably in the place where some of the original Croatian settlers first saw the blue sea, as capricious as it is beautiful that both protected and defended them, fed and took care of them for as long as they could remember. Today Šibenik has 47,274 inhabitants (2011) and is the capital as well as the cultural, educational, administrative and economic centre of the County of Šibenik and Knin.